Jacqueline Pitanguy interview on Maria da Penha law, violence against women, and Brazil judicial system (video)

Jacqueline Pitanguy interview on Maria da Penha law, violence against women, and Brazil judicial system (video)

Resource Type
Topical Interview
Publication Year
2010
Language
English (US)

Topics

Country

Tags

Part of a series of interviews focusing on best practices for activists and human rights organizations with speakers and panelists of WLP's "2020 Vision" event, itself part of the 2010 annual session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York City. 

Jacqueline Pitanguy is the founder and Executive Director of WLP Brazil/Cidadania, Estudo, Pesquisa, Informaçao e Açao (CEPIA), Brazil and President of the National Council for Women’s Affairs, Brazil (1986-89). She discusses campaign that led to the 2006 landmark Maria da Penha law, comprehensive anti-VAW legislation named for a paraplegic survivor of domestic violence. Describes history of Police non-recognition as crime, introduction of special courts for petty crimes, previous court focus on reconciliation, community service as punishment, decharacterization of Violence against women as 'aggression.' Involvement of specialist lawyers and federal representatives as rapporteurs on project, involvement of public through state level assemblies. Remarks on Maria da Penha's case as emblematic of course of justice. Advancements made at police level but not judicial. Describes detail of law, articles protecting women. Remarks that progress never unilateral. Discusses criticism of law as unconstitutional, arguing that is constitutional because works for men and women. Describes recent ruling, threats to Maria da Penha law, training of judges and clerks on Violence against women. 

Runtime: 0:32:36